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Old 04-08-2013, 08:53 AM
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My son now attends college since Fall 2012. We rcvd 3 1098-T.

My son now attends college since Fall 2012. We rcvd 3 1098-T.

One from the college and 2 from 2 different colleges because he took 2 classes in high school and rcvd college credit. Those 2 were obviously a minimal amount ($200 + 180) in comparison to the college he now attends (over $30,000).

Is there any way to claim the 200 + 180 on our or his tax form with a tax benefit?
We are already getting the American Opportunity Credit (1000) and Lifetime Learning credit (1500).

Thanks for the help!



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Old 04-08-2013, 11:08 AM
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“Is there any way to claim the 200 + 180 on our or his tax form with a tax benefit?”========== When you pay the post-secondary school costs, even for a high school student, the school sends you a Form 1098-T at the end of the year that shows how much you paid. As you're the parent of a high school student who was taking college courses and you're footing the bill, you might qualify for the tuition and fees deduction. In the past, the IRS took the position that to claim the tuition and fees tax deduction, the student needed to have completed high school or received a GED. However, in 2012, the IRS issued new guidance that suggests the costs paid for high school students to take certain college courses may also qualify for the tuition and fees deduction.As long as your child was still in high school but took classes at or through a college, university, you may qualify to write off those tuition costs as part of the tuition and fees tax deduction. For example, if your child enrolls in a biology course at the local college as part of an early-entry program while he's still in high school, you could use the tuition that you pay to the college for the deduction. The deduction is limited to $4,000 per year.When you file your taxes, you have to use either Form 1040 or Form 1040A. To claim the tuition and fees deduction, you have to use Form 8917.You can claim either this deduction, the American Opportunity or Lifetime Learning education tax credits; the IRS only allows taxpayers to claim one of these tax breaks.



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