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Old 03-17-2017, 06:08 AM
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Angry my ex sucks

hi! so my dummy ex husband has been claiming 6 dependents on his w4 for 3-4 years now(before split). The last 2 years 2013 & 2014 I fought back and I told him to stop doing or I was not going to file for us again because I kept getting stuck with the payments he owed.

in 2016 we spilt up in January. We were fighting and it was getting pretty bad but he refused to move out. So, I filed my taxes married but seperate and claimed our daughter (he as a daughter from a previous relationship....1 each) so that I could have money to find a place for me and my daughter to move to before we were an episode of snapped!! NOT KIDDING
When my refund came they had taken almost half of it because he was not paying vehicle registration for several "toys" he had. Even though it was all in his name they took my taxes.

Now he hasn't filed his 2015 taxes because without having two kids and a spouse to claim his tax owed is over 7000.00...

He is telling me it was illegal to file married but separate and it was illegal for me to claim my own kid!

Is there some way to get the debt he is going to owe away from me. I told him and told him to stop and I did not want to pay the tax bill again.


I saw a form at IRS about that but cant find the one I printed and can't rememeber what it is called.



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Old 03-17-2017, 04:01 PM
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hi! so my dummy ex husband has been claiming 6 dependents on his w4 for 3-4 years now(before split). The last 2 years 2013 & 2014 I fought back and I told him to stop doing or I was not going to file for us again because I kept getting stuck with the payments he owed. ======>Dependents claimed on your tax return are often not the same as allowances on the Form W-4. Allowances on the W-4 are designed to reduce your income by the amount of non-taxable income calculated on your tax return. if you decide to claim more allowances than are valid for your situation, you will end up not paying enough tax through withholding for the year; This is not a smart move, and could subject you to underpayment penalties, and even interest!

in 2016 we spilt up in January. We were fighting and it was getting pretty bad but he refused to move out. So, I filed my taxes married but seperate and claimed our daughter (he as a daughter from a previous relationship....1 each) so that I could have money to find a place for me and my daughter to move to before we were an episode of snapped!! NOT KIDDING
When my refund came they had taken almost half of it because he was not paying vehicle registration for several "toys" he had. Even though it was all in his name they took my taxes.======>you can claim An injured spouse claim that can help you get back your part of a tax refund from a joint tax return. It applies where the IRS has intercepted the refund to offset a debt owed by your spouse but not by you; In general, your share of a refund consists of the payments you made plus a pro-rated portion of any refundable credits. If you had federal income tax withheld from your paycheck or if you made estimated tax payments on your self-employment income, the portion of the joint refund represented by those payments will be included in your share. If you have already filed the joint return, you need to complete Form 8379 and mail it to the IRS Center at which you filed your tax return.


Now he hasn't filed his 2015 taxes because without having two kids and a spouse to claim his tax owed is over 7000.00...

He is telling me it was illegal to file married but separate and it was illegal for me to claim my own kid! =======> I do not think so; When it comes to your filing status for tax purposes, only one day of the year matters: December 31. If you were still legally married on the last day of the year, you typically cannot file your taxes as a single taxpayer, even if you were no longer living with your spouseaslongas you are married unless you are legally separated, Married taxpayers can choose between filing a joint tax return or a separate tax return. The Married Filing Separately filing status provides fewer tax benefits than filing joint returns, so taxpayers will need to weigh the pros and cons and decide for themselves which is the best filing statusThe married filing separately (MFS) filing status is generally perceived as the least beneficial of all the filing statuses. That's because MFS taxpayers are not eligible to claim the tax benefits scuh as Tuition and fees deduction; Student loan interest deduction;Tax-free exclusion of US bond interest


Is there some way to get the debt he is going to owe away from me. I told him and told him to stop and I did not want to pay the tax bill again. I saw a form at IRS about that but cant find the one I printed and can't rememeber what it is called.=========>as mentioned above, If you received no notice in advance of the interception of the refund, then you may file Form 8379 as soon as you know the refund has been intercepted. If an agency notifies either you or your spouse that your tax refund will be withheld to pay your spouse's debt, you may file the injured spouse claim with your joint tax return. You need to complete Form 8379 and attach it to your next tax return. The inclusion of Form 8379 on a tax return will not prevent electronic filing of that return. To qualify for an injured spouse claim, You are not required to pay the past-due amount. This means that the debt is one which your spouse incurred before you got married or that the debt is one for which only your spouse is liable. Examples are past-due child support, defaulted student loans, foreclosures on federal loans, or etc.You reported income on the joint tax return. Some or all of the income on the joint return whose refund was withheld must be your own income from a job, self-employment, or investments. If your income for the tax year in question is $0.00, then your "share" of any refund is also $0.00. You made and reported payments on the joint return. Payments include federal income tax withheld from your wages, estimated tax payments, and refundable tax credits, such as the earned income tax credit or additional child tax credit



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