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Old 02-27-2015, 03:51 PM
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Thumbs down Filing requirements for a dual citizen living abroad

Hi, any insight into this would be greatly appreciated. I'm a full-time online student, I'm an American-German dual citizen permanently living in the UK. I have lived in England since July 2013. I am also married to a British citizen, he is not a resident of the U.S. whatsoever. I have never filed taxes before, my parents have always told me that if I'm making less than $5,000 a year, I don't have to worry about filing.
I have been accepting federal aid for school, and a family member has also been helping me pay for it.
I already know that I will have to pay US taxes, despite not living there anymore, once graduate school and get a salaried job.
My only forms of income at the moment are my student loans, the money I receive from working part-time in retail over here, and some money from my family member for school.
My question is, what parts of my income do I have to file for, and do I have to file for the money I'm receiving from my family member? If it's all just pretty general, what is the cut-off amount for which you have to file for if its unearned, and being given to you as "gift" money?



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Old 02-28-2015, 12:06 AM
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Hi, any insight into this would be greatly appreciated. I'm a full-time online student, I'm an American-German dual citizen permanently living in the UK. I have lived in England since July 2013. I am also married to a British citizen, he is not a resident of the U.S. whatsoever. I have never filed taxes before, my parents have always told me that if I'm making less than $5,000 a year, I don't have to worry about filing.=.Not really it always depends ; as a US resident, you need to pay taxes on your US source and world wide income that you earn overseas. In return , you can claim foreign tax credit on all taxes paid to foreign taxing authority(ies)on your US return by reporting it on 1040line 47 or on Sch A of 1040 line 8.As a self employer, you need to file return aslongas the amount on Sch C line 29/ 31 is $400 or exceeds $400 and need to pay self employment taxes aslongas the amount on Sch SE line 2 / 3 is also $400 or exceeds $400.Also, If you are filing as a sole proprietor and/or a self-employed individual, you generally have to make estimated tax payments if you expect to owe tax of $1K or more when you file your return.however, You do not have to pay estimated tax for the current year if you had no tax liability for the prior year
;You were a U.S. citizen or resident for the whole year; Your prior tax year covered a 12 month period


I have been accepting federal aid for school, and a family member has also been helping me pay for it.
I already know that I will have to pay US taxes, despite not living there anymore, once graduate school and get a salaried job.==>It also depends; unless you are a dependent ogf another person, you do not need to file return aslongas your gross income is less than $1,0150;standard deduction $6200+personal exemption;$3,950.but, You must file a federal income tax return if your income is above a certain level; which varies depending on your filing status, age and the type of income you receive



My only forms of income at the moment are my student loans, =====>>Student loan is not considered income, and do not need to be reported on your income taxes in the years that you borrow them. Student loans are not part of your income. However, you may be required to report any income you get from a teaching assistantship or scholarship that exceeds the cost of your tuition and books. Once you begin paying your student loans off, you can deduct the interest earned on your federal income taxes. You can claim up to $2,500 in interest each year. This deduction is made directly to your income, and you do not need to itemize to take advantage of it.


the money I receive from working part-time in retail over here==.whehter this is taxable depends on its amount as said above.

and some money from my family member for school.=======.This is not income it is a gift from your family member no tax on it
My question is, what parts of my income do I have to file for, and do I have to file for the money I'm receiving from my family member?=====>As mentioned above.

If it's all just pretty general, what is the cut-off amount for which you have to file for if its unearned, =====as said, the info is here;
Do I Need to File a Tax Return?-Federal Filing Requirements

and being given to you as "gift" money?=====> A s a recipient of a gift, you do not need to pay any tax on it; the donor, aslongas his/her cumulative gift amount is $5.35 million for 2015, then he needs to pay gift tax. Connecticut is the only state that imposes a true gift tax



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